Great Britain

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James Mackay  |  Nov 30, 2010  |  0 comments

The exact date on which William Shakespeare was born in Stratford-upon-Avon is unknown, but tradition says it was on St George’s Day, April 23, 1564.

The Post Office’s long-standing refusal to countenance stamps in honour of famous people gave it a problem in 1964 when there was agitation for a special issue of stamps to mark the 400th anniversary.

But it found a way around its discomfort.

James Mackay  |  Nov 30, 2010  |  0 comments

Sir Winston Churchill was 90 years old when he died on January 24, 1965.

Remarkably, he had been a member of the House of Commons until as recently as the previous autumn.

As Britain’s greatest parliamentarian and war leader, not to mention a Nobel Prize-winning author, a journalist and an accomplished artist, he was an obvious subject for a set of stamps, but the Post Office established a new precedent in issuing them.

Julia Lee  |  Nov 03, 2010  |  0 comments

The 1924 three-halfpence for the British Empire Exhibition Until the mid-1920s, the British postal authorities had consistently shunned the idea of commemoratives, an opinion shared by the 'philatelist king' George V, who branded the notion of special event stamps ‘un-English’.

Before 1924 the British Post Office had issued a few items of commemorative postal stationery, but never a commemorative stamp.


 The birth of the stamps
 In the early planning for the British Empire Exhibition, a strong case was made that the only special issue should be postal stationery.

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